Conducting Communication in the Workplace

Conducting a meeting is like conducting an orchestra? Definitely. The ‘conductor’ in a meeting needs to ensure that all the ‘instruments’ get a chance to be heard, that the tempo is right and everyone is on the same page of the ‘music’.  The conductor in an orchestra uses many subtle signals and cues to communicate with the musicians and in the same way we, as leaders and managers of people, employ a huge repertoire of words and movement to convey meaning and understanding to those around us. Watch how Itay Talgram – conductor of music turned “conductor of people” – masterfully and entertainingly demonstrates how conductors communicate effectively and why these are good lessons for leaders. Talgram  guides us through a range of conducting styles in this 20 minute TEDGlobal talk, Lead like the great conductors. Check out this too: 8 Leadership Lessons from a Symphony Conductor . We communicate constantly and we do it consciously and unconsciously.  As a leaders and managers, being able to convey our meaning clearly and concisely to those who need to understand it; being skilled at listening and well as talking and being able to construct communications that hit the mark again and again are essential skills.  Without them we won’t inspire others, we won’t influence anyone, we won’t take the people with us; we won’t be leaders. For further reading and ideas: Peoplewatching: The Desmond Morris Guide to Body Language by Desmond Morris Powerful Listening. Powerful Influence. by Tim Hast Humour Works by John Morreall The Pyramid Principle by Barbara Minto If you would like to communicate better, we can help with one to one coaching or through one of our many...

The Field of Freedom

Would you like to delegate work to someone without feeling the need to step in and do the job yourself? Would you like people to use their initiative without the fear that they might go too far? Whether you are talking to employees, subcontractors, associates or trades people, they all need clear information but also the opportunity to use their initiative and their creativity. Imagine a game in which it was ok for the head coach to run onto the pitch and kick the ball whenever he was unhappy with the way the player was kicking it. Sounds ridiculous? Why then, is it acceptable for a manager to take a job back from a member of his work team and do it himself because he is unhappy with the way the team member is doing it? Who is at fault, the team member or the team manager? The white lines that define the field of play in a game of football, rugby or basketball keep the coach off the pitch during the game. If we are to motivate and enable people we need to give them the space in which to play their own game but we need to keep that game within clear boundaries. We need to delegate responsibility in a way that gives them the greatest scope for development and satisfaction and gives us, the managers, the confidence to let them get on with it – we need to give them a Field of Freedom. * * * “If we are to motivate and enable people we need to give them the space in which to play their own game but we need to keep that game within clear...